TORQ 3 Help File

Version 3.0.6 12/2/2010

Home Page Help

Overview

You’re currently on the Home Page of TORQ 3, which is the hub of the program.  From here you can easily Start a New Project, Open an Existing Project, View short tutorials and tips/tricks on using TORQ, and read about your colleagues’ use of TORQ throughout the country in TORQ in Action.

In addition, through the menu in the upper right corner of the screen, you may directly return to this Home Page whenever you want, from anywhere in the program, at any time.  You may also open the Project Manager where you can create, edit, delete, and open your own TORQ Projects, review and change information about you and your preferences in MyTORQ, and Sign Out from the program when you’re finished.

Key Advice

Check out the Tutorials.  These short, to-the-point videos demonstrate what the TORQ 3 system can do. Once you know what it can do, it’s pretty straightforward to learn how to do it.   Take 10 minutes, watch three or four tutorials, and you will save a lot of time and effort in the future.  We promise!

Want to be in TORQ IN ACTION?

We’re always looking to share success stories and promising practices about how TORQ is put to use across the country. If you’d like to share your efforts and insights, please contact admin@torqworks.net to discover how you can be top of the column next.

Need More Help?

If you ever need more help, please don’t hesitate to call TORQ Customer Service at 317-841-0133 and/or email torq@workforceassociates.com.

 

Create New Project Help

TORQ 3 asks users to think in terms of “Projects” in an effort to organize saved work on the system, and to work through complex issues in a straightforward manner. 

Project Name

You can name projects however you like. We should note that, since the system automatically saves the date you created the project and the last time you worked on that project,  you don’t need to insert any date information into the title to be able to find or sort your projects by date later. Also, keep in mind that any reports you generate to download and/or print out from TORQ will use that project name, so choose something descriptive and precise.

Select a Project Type

To work with TORQ 3, you must choose one of three different types of projects to work on.  (We’ll be adding more project types in the future, based on other work flows that TORQ users commonly use.)

·         Single Occupation View

·         Reemployment Analysis

·         Economic Development Analysis

Single Occupation View

If all you really want to do is browse through occupations, view or save information about single occupations, and output that information to a Word or Excel file, choose the Single Occupation View project type. This is the easiest project to run within TORQ 3: it’s a single screen page, allows great flexibility, and is a great project type to play with as you get to know the system. Single Occupation View can also be helpful as a basic career exploration tool, especially if you don’t immediately know what occupation you’re looking for.

Reemployment Analysis

TORQ 3 provides a three-step workflow for determining the best paths from one occupation to another. This is a classic task for career counselors and those preparing Rapid Response plans for mass layoffs. This project is designed to make it easy to create action plans for a single occupation, as if you are a career counselor helping an unemployed person find a new job. It is also easy to batch multiple occupations into a single project, as if you are preparing for a Rapid Response session where multiple occupations are impacted.

The first step is to identify the current occupation(s) of interest. Usually that’s either a person’s current or most recent job. The system makes it easy to identify the right occupation title from all of the occupations included in O*NET.

The second step is to evaluate prospects for transitioning from the current occupation to a next occupation, based on TORQ scores. The system makes it easy to choose one or more possible occupations based on comparing Abilities, Skills and Knowledge of the pair of occupations, as well as a variety of labor market information (earnings, employment, etc.) for potential transition occupations.  It will also show current job postings for these occupations. All of this is provided to allow the analyst to choose a short list of the best “next” occupations.

The third step is to generate report output to share with clients and colleagues.  Again, the system makes it easy to choose which data elements to include and which format to export to your computer as a Microsoft Excel document.

Economic Development Analysis

TORQ 3 provides a three-step workflow for evaluating current and future labor market developments and provide policy makers with accurate and up-to-date reports to help shape economic development policy and programs. This is a classic task for LMI analysts, business services professionals, and regional economic specialists interested in workforce development and attracting employers to the area.

The first step is to identify the target occupation(s) of interest. Usually these are occupations for which more workers are needed for the region or for a specific employer. It might also be a group of occupations that are considered important to cultivate for future growth, such as “Green” jobs, teachers, or other categories. The system makes it easy to identify the right occupation title from all of the occupations included in O*NET.

The second step is to identify the most promising possible source occupations for your target occupation, based on their TORQ scores for transferability. The system ranks the other occupations by ease of transition (TORQ score) and compares employment and compensation data to make it easy to choose one or more source occupations. All of this is provided to allow the analyst to choose a short-list of the best places to find candidates for the target occupation.

The third step is to generate report output to share with clients and colleagues.  Again, the system makes it easy to choose which data elements to include and which format to export to your computer as a Microsoft Excel document.  The Excel file is designed specifically to make it easy for the analyst to customize the information required, change graphs, etc. and then format for final output.

Select a Primary Labor Market

Each state is divided into geographical labor markets, allowing counselors and analysts to look at specific labor market areas or the entire state at once. In most cases, a project will focus on one of these geographies. To start a project, you need to choose a region. You will still be able to see data for other regions throughout the project, but the system asks you to start somewhere in your state and this is the place and time to do that.

For a complete breakdown of your state’s regions, contact your group administrator. (Go to MyTORQ and view the contact information there.)

 

Project Manager Help

This page allows you to restart, edit, and delete existing projects.  It also provides a button on the upper right to Create a New Project.

 

Projects Pane

This section of the page simply lists all of your personal projects in the system.  You can click on each column title to sort the table by that item.  Click a second time and the sort order will reverse.

To restart a project, simply click on that project’s name.

To edit or delete, simply click on the project line’s “edit” or “delete” link.  If you choose to “delete”, TORQ will ask you a second time to ensure you don’t delete by mistake.

Filters Pane

We expect that your list of projects will get very long, so we’ve included simple filters on the left side of the screen to limit the projects that are listed in the Projects Pane. By typing in the “Project name” filter box, you will restrict the list in the right to matching project names.  Click on the “Project type” filter and similarly the list will be restricted only to the type(s) you have clicked on.  Same thing for Date Created and Last Updated.  (You can expect that sorting behavior anywhere in TORQ there is a columnar data table.)

Single Occupation Project

 

This project type makes it very easy to browse through occupations, view or save information about single occupations, and output that information to a variety of easy-to-use formats.  This is the easiest project to run within TORQ 3, as it’s a single screen page, allows great flexibility, and is a great project type to play with as you get to know the system.

First Action – Choose Occupation

TORQ 3 includes a single search box through which you choose one of the available occupations of interest. As you type in the box, the system looks through the official O*NET occupation title, the O*NET code, as well as a long list of informal “lay titles” (provided by O*NET) that refer to official O*NET occupations. The search box then returns a list of occupation titles that meet the criteria you typed.

If you know the official title, just start typing it.

If you know the numeric O*NET occupation code, just start typing it, and include the “-“ after the second digit. Experienced users will see this as a quick short cut to O*NET’s groupings by the first two digits.

If you don’t know either of the above, just start typing words you do know that describe something about the occupation for which you’re searching.  For example, “diver” returns the following list of possible O*NET occupations, their full search term, and a short explanation as to why they’re in the list.

 

Occupation Title Search Example – “diver”

O*NET Title

Lay Title Reference

Why Included

Actors

Diver

This refers to a performance “diver,” much like some of these other “Actor” lay titles in the list:  Clown, Stunt Woman, Wire Walker.

Agricultural Equipment Operators

Farmworker, Diversified Crops

“Diver” is part of  the word  “Diversified” in this title.

Athletes and Sports Competitors

Diver

Should be clear.

Commercial Divers

Deep Sea Diver, Marine Diver, Scuba Diver, Skin Diver, etc.

Should be clear.

Farmers and Ranchers

Farmer, Diversified Crops

“Diver” is part of “Diversified” in this title.

Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop

Farmer, Diversified Crops

“Diver” is part of “Diversified” in this title.

Fishers and Related Fishing Workers

Deep Sea Diver, Hunter Skin Diver

Should be clear.

Helpers – Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers

Helper, Diver

Apparently Divers need Helpers too!

Human Resources Managers

Diversity Manager

“Diver” is part of “Diversity”

 

Finding the “correct” Occupation Title is part science, part art when working with O*NET.  TORQ 3 remains true to all of the O*NET official data sets and strives to present the easiest tool for making the best choice.

A couple of notes:

·         Upper-case and Lower-case letters are the same for this search box, they make no difference in what you find.

·         If searching by O*NET code, you must insert the “-“ between the second and third digit.

·         Entering key words in any order will get you to the listings you need. For example, typing “nurse registered” will retrieve the same list of matching occupation titles as “registered nurse.”

 

Second Action – View Data Categories

Once you choose the O*NET Occupation Title of interest, the system returns the following information for your on-screen review and ultimate inclusion in report output.

Occupation Overview

The official O*NET dataset includes a definition of the occupation and a listing of core tasks the occupation typically requires.

Work Experience

TORQ 3 displays an O*NET occupation’s Related Work Experience in graphical form, based on the distribution of different levels of experience in this occupation listed in O*NET.

Education

The Education tab displays the distribution of education levels for the occupation according to O*NET. These data are not specific to the chosen Labor Market Area, but rather reflect the national average for the selected occupation.

Also in this tab is listed the O*NET Job Zone, a basic indicator of the level of the occupation’s experience and education requirements, ranging from 1 (Little or No Preparation Needed) to 5 (Extensive Preparation Need).  For more information, see the O*NET online descriptions for Job Zone at http://online.onetcenter.org/find/zone.

Finally, TORQ 3 also lists Education Programs specific to the selected occupation and available in or near the selected Labor Market Area. This list is created by matching job codes to the IPEDS (Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System) database of postsecondary educational programs and the institutions that provide them.

Compensation

Earnings data are displayed in this tab and come from the latest figures in the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) database that is supplied to TORQ 3 by state Labor Market Information providers as part of our licensing agreement.

If no data are displayed, it is because there are no source data on earnings for this labor market area. (This may be because of confidentiality restrictions on the display of such data at the state level.) TORQ 3 will never estimate or otherwise “create” data to fill in the blanks, and is therefore an excellent front-end to the state’s own datasets.

Employment Data

This tab displays OES data from State LMI regarding the number of people employed in the selected occupation in the current labor market area, as well as projections for future employment and change in employment over time made by the state according to BLS methodology. 

In addition, TORQ 3 displays the Top Industries for the selected occupation on a national basis according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The blue “Base Industry Ratio” indicates what percentage of the selected occupation’s total nationwide employment is located in the displayed industries.

Current Job Postings

In TORQ 3 this tab displays a list of current job openings for the selected occupation in the Labor Market selected. These data come from the SimplyHired Internet job board and reflect a broad sample of available jobs. While SimplyHired aggregates job listings from a very broad set of Web-based job boards in real time, including both public and private sector postings, it is not necessarily a complete list of available jobs. We suggest that job seekers use additional resources to find additional listings.

TORQ Transitions

TORQ’s unique value is its ability to quantify the challenge of transitioning from one occupation to another. Based on a proprietary algorithm and O*NET’s official dataset, the “Grand TORQ Score” for any combination of two occupations is a number from 0-100: the higher the number, the easier it is to transition from one occupation to another.

The “Top Ten Next Occupations” listed in the TORQ Transitions tab is a simple list of the current occupations (TORQ Score = 100) and the next 10 “easiest” occupations to transition to based on their respective Abilities, Skills, and Knowledge required.  The table also shows wage and employment data for each of those occupations, making it easy to decide which occupations to consider moving toward.

The “Top Ten Source Occupations (Labor Pool)” is the conceptual mirror-image of the table above, though we hasten to add that the unique algorithm used to calculate this path considers the task differently. In this case, we’re listing the occupations that are easiest to transition “from” in order to become the selected target occupation (Grand TORQ Score = 100). Here we’re answering the question, “if we need more of the selected occupation, where’s the easiest occupations to find qualified people.”

Third Action – Generate reports via Report Binder

TORQ 3 includes a report output device called the “Report Binder,” which is available throughout the system.

Select Data Categories

The system defaults to include all of the available Data Categories in Single Occupation View in the Report Binder. To exclude any of those categories from the report, simply click the “x” next to the Data Category listed in the Report Binder. To include a Data Category that is not in the Report Binder list, click on the “Include in Report” button found in the pane where that category’s data is displayed.

Please note that there is no capability to select or unselect data from within a category. So in the case of Education, for example, if you include Education in the Report Binder the report will include all of the Education information. There is no way to include the Required Education Level while you exclude the Job Zone information, for example. You can edit the downloaded report file to achieve that goal.

Select Report Format to Download

TORQ 3 generates automatic reports that are ready for output to print or for further editing and inclusion in other work by the user.

TORQ 3 can output to twodifferent formats.

·         Excel – TORQ 3 exports a report in .xlsx format, compatible with Microsoft Office 2007.  If you are using older versions of Excel, you won’t be able to view or edit the file unless you install a Microsoft-provided tool that enables older versions of Office to read, edit and save Microsoft’s new file format found in Office 2007.  Go to http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx for more information.

·         Word – TORQ 3 exports a report in .docx format, compatible with Microsoft Office Word 2007. If you are using older versions of Word, you won’t be able to view or edit the file unless you install a Microsoft-provided tool that enables older versions of Office to read, edit and save Microsoft’s new file format found in Office 2007.  Go to http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx for more information.

 

Reemployment Analysis Project

 

TORQ 3 provides a three-step workflow for determining the best paths from one occupation to another. This is a classic task for career counselors and those preparing Rapid Response plans for mass layoffs. This project is designed to make it easy to create action plans for a single occupation, as if you are a career counselor helping an unemployed person find a new job. It is also easy to batch multiple occupations into a single report, as if you are preparing for a Rapid Response session where multiple occupations are impacted.

The first step is to identify the current occupation(s) of interest. Usually that’s either a person’s current or most recent job. The system makes it easy to identify the right occupation title from all of the occupations included in O*NET.

The second step is to evaluate prospects for transitioning from the current occupation to a next occupation, based on TORQ scores. The system makes it easy to choose one or more possible occupations based on comparing Abilities, Skills and Knowledge of the pair of occupations, as well as a variety of labor market information (earnings, employment, etc.) for potential transition occupations.  All of this is provided to allow the analyst to choose a short list of the best “next” occupations.

The third step is to generate report output to share with clients and colleagues.  Again, the system makes it easy to choose which data elements to include and which format to export to your computer as an Excel file for further review.

 

First Action – Select Current Occupation

The goal of the first page is to fill the upper right “Selected CURRENT Occupation” Pane with one or more occupations that you will analyze one at a time in the project’s next stage. The “current” occupation is your starting point – what a worker might transition from. This page is designed to make it easy to work on one occupation or multiple occupations per project.  Once all of the occupations desired are listed in the “Selected CURRENT Occupation” list, click on “Next” in the “Project Stage” Pane to move to the next part of the project.

The page starts with all of the O*NET-coded occupations listed in the “CURRENT Occupation” Pane in the middle of the screen.  It is from this list that you choose the occupations for further analysis by clicking on “+add” on that occupation’s line in the “CURRENT Occupation” Pane.

The series of filters on the left side of the screen in the “Filters” Pane makes it easy to restrict the full list of occupations to a manageable set from which to choose the specific occupation(s) of interest.

When you select a filter, the filter title appears next to the “CURRENT Occupations” Pane header.  To remove a filter, simply click on the “x” next to its title.

Filters

Occupation – type in the O*NET Occupation title, the O*NET code, or any other descriptor of the occupation of interest and the middle pane of “CURRENT Occupations” will be filtered accordingly. If you know the official title, just start typing it. If you know the numeric O*NET occupation code, just start typing it, and include the “-“ after the second digit. Experienced users will see this as a quick short cut to O*NET’s groupings by the first two digits. If you don’t know either of the above, just start typing words you do know that describe something about the occupation for which you’re searching. TORQ contains a complete library of “lay titles” that can help match your informal search terms with an official, coded occupation name.

O*NET Job Family – When one or more of the Job Families listed in this filter set is selected, the list of “CURRENT Occupations” will change to display only occupations in those families.

 

Second Action – Select Next Occupations

With one or more occupations selected to analyze, it’s time to dig into the possible transitions for each of those occupations.  The goal of this project step is to fill the upper right pane called “Selected CURRENT/NEXT Combinations” with a series of transition pairs for further review and inclusion in a project report.

The blue box in the middle of the page under the “CURRENT Occupation” title shows, in a drop-down box, all of the “current” occupations that were selected in the previous project stage. When one is selected, the NEXT Occupation table below is displayed, and here is where the magic of TORQ comes to the aid of analysts and counselors.

Occupations listed in “Next Occupation” are sorted by their Grand TORQ score, indicating the difficulty or ease of moving to that particular occupation from the Current Occupation.  Relevant Labor Market Information is displayed along with each occupation listed, to make it easy to decide whether or not to select transitions.  So if the TORQ score is high (generally, above 90) it should be easier to move to that job in terms of its Abilities, Skills, and Knowledge required.  Yet if the Median Wage is significantly lower than that of the Current Occupation, it may not be a good candidate for transition and can be ignored for further analysis.

To see more detailed information about the TORQ score, click on the triangle just to the left of the Occupation title in the list and detailed TORQ scores for Ability, Skills and Knowledge will appear in a new pane.  Here you’ll see two kinds of specific data about the transition from the “current” occupation to the selected occupation from the “NEXT Occupation” list:

A-S-K TORQs:

Each TORQ score breaks down into three individual TORQ scores for the specific O*NET attribute categories of Abilities, Skills, and Knowledge. The Grand TORQ is simply a weighted average of these three scores. The differences between the three can be important. For example, if the Abilities TORQ is high, but Skills and Knowledge are lower, this may mean that an individual now working in the “current” occupation may be able to make the transition successfully with an appropriate investment in training.

A-S-K Gaps

TORQ scores take into account the overall transferability between the entire sets of Abilities, Skills, and Knowledge from O*NET. It is important to know what gaps exist between individual Abilities, Skills, and Knowledge attributes as well. (You’ll see the size of the gap indicated in the “GAP” column.)  It’s also important to understand how important the individual ability is to an occupation. (This rating is found in the “IMP” column.)  A large gap, say more than -10, is a big deal if its importance is 83, for example.  If the importance is only 40, however, the fact that there’s a large gap may not represent a significant hurdle to the transition.

Once all the transition candidates are selected in the “Selected CURRENT/NEXT Combinations,” click on “Next” in the “Project Stage” Pane in the upper left of the screen to move to the last stage of the Reemployment Analysis Project.

 

Third Action – Prepare Report

At this stage it’s time to review all of the preliminary selections of Current to Next occupations in greater detail and make a final assessment to include or not include them in the final report. 

In the blue box, simply select one of the Current/Next Occupation pairs to review in detail and click on the different Data Categories to compare and contrast the two.  Once you are satisfied that you want to include in the report, select the next pairing in the blue box and repeat the process. If you decide to NOT continue with a pairing, simply “Remove” the pair from the project by clicking on the “x” under “Remove” in the upper right listing of Selected CURRENT/NEXT Occupations.

Once satisfied with all the potential pairings, it’s time to generate reports.

Because TORQ 3 Reemployment Analysis allows you to select several different Current Occupations for the project, the reporting process asks you to select the individual Current Occupations one at a time to report in an easy-to-consume format.  In the Report Binder, simply select the Current Occupation you want to report on and click on the Download Report button. TORQ will prompt you to open or save the Excel file at that point. After choosing, you may run another report by selecting a different Current Occupation in the Report Binder.

My TORQ Help

The “My TORQ” page is where the individual user can edit his or her personal information available in the system as well as his or her default preferences for key variables. MyTORQ also gives users access to TORQ’s Custom Filter creation tool. The tabs on the left of the screen make it easy to display and edit the information as needed.

My Info

The top half of the screen for the “My Info” tab displays useful information for the end user.

The Email Address is the “user name” that a person types in to log in to the system. It also serves as the primary email address for communicating with the end user. This can only be edited by the Group Administrator.

The Group Admin Contact is the name of one or more employees of a Client Group serving as the primary contact for all information between that customer and Workforce Associates. The Group Admin Contact has certain capabilities to help manage the group of employees using the system. See “Group Admin Tools” below.

Accessible Labor Market Areas is a list of geographic zones that the individual user has the right to view. This can only be changed by an Administrator.

User Access Level indicates the level of user rights and responsibilities in the system.  The typical TORQ 3 user is a “Standard” user.

The bottom half of the screen allows the user to edit and save any changes to the indicated information.  Just click “Save” after editing.

Preferences

The Preferences tab displays default settings within TORQ 3 that the user can change.

The Default State and Default Labor Market setting simply sets what will first appear in the Labor Market list when the user creates a new project. 

Change Password

The Change Password tab allows you to (guess what) change your password!  It also indicates the minimum requirements when choosing a secure password for the system.

My Filters

In “My Filters,” you can create and edit custom lists of occupations that can be applied as filters in your Reemployment Analysis and Economic Development Analysis projects. TORQ’s custom filters make it easy and convenient to assess transferability to jobs in demand or any other list of frequently-used occupations you’d like to define.

To use My Filters, just click on the “My Filters” selection on the left-hand menu. If you have created any custom filters already, you will find a list of them in “My Filters,” with links that allow you to edit or delete them. You will also find a link on the upper right of the pane called “Create New Filter.” When you click on “Create NewFilter” or choose to edit an existing custom filter, you’ll arrive at the filter creation screen. Here’s what you’ll find when you get there:

The Occupation List

In the center pane you will find the complete list of O*NET occupation titles, which you can add to your filter individually with the “+add” button, or as a group with the “add all” link at the top of the pane.

Standard Filters

On the left side of the screen, you will find a familiar array of standard filters which will help you narrow down the occupation list to what you’re interested in seeing. You can search for occupations one-by-one with the Occupation filter box, or choose groups by O*NET Job Family, Job Zone, BLS Education level, “Green” status, and/or by Industry. For example, if you wanted to create a filter based on Green jobs in O*NET Job Zones 1 and 2, you could click the check boxes related to each category in the standard filters and quickly derive a list of them in the center pane.

“Selected FILTER Occupations”

The right-hand pane keeps track of the occupations you have selected for your custom filter and also gives you the ability to name and save your custom filter. Once you give your custom filter a name and save it, you will see it under “My Filters” on the left-hand column of your Reemployment Analysis and Economic Development Analysis reports.  If you don’t want to see your custom filters when you work on projects, but don’t want to delete the filter, you can use the “Hidden” check box on this pane to hide it from view.

Also, your user group’s TORQ Group Administrator can create custom filters for the entire user group to use – if, for example, there is a mass layoff project on which many people in the group will be working, or a regional list of “hot jobs,” the Group Admin can share a filter with the entire user group. It will show up under “Group Filters” in your Reemployment Analysis and Economic Development Analysis projects. For more information, contact your TORQ Group Administrator.

 

//END OF HELP FILE//